Asthma and Cavities Both Common in Kids But Not Linked

Gerardo Maupomé, B.D.S., M.Sc., Ph.D.
Gerardo Maupomé, B.D.S., M.Sc., Ph.D.

There is no apparent link between asthma and tooth decay, according to a study published in the September 2010 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association.

“Is There a Relationship between Asthma and Dental Caries?: A Critical Review of the Literature” examined the 27 separate studies which looked for a link between asthma and cavities that were reported in 29 papers published between 1976 and March 2010.

“The notion that there is a link between asthma and tooth decay may have its origin in anecdotal statements by emergency room workers who see children with poorly managed asthma. These children could also be more likely to have poorly managed dental conditions, and therefore tooth decay. It’s reasonable to believe that poor clinical management may be associated with both conditions, not the asthma that is causing the cavities,” said Gerardo Maupomé, B.D.S., M.Sc., Ph.D., professor of preventive and community dentistry at the Indiana University School of Dentistry and a Regenstrief Institute affiliated scientist.  He is the first author of the new JADA study.

Read More >>